The Resource Hear me talkin' to ya : the story of jazz as told by the men who made it, edited by Nat Shapiro [and] Nat Hentoff, (electronic resource ;)

Hear me talkin' to ya : the story of jazz as told by the men who made it, edited by Nat Shapiro [and] Nat Hentoff, (electronic resource ;)

Label
Hear me talkin' to ya : the story of jazz as told by the men who made it
Title
Hear me talkin' to ya
Title remainder
the story of jazz as told by the men who made it
Statement of responsibility
edited by Nat Shapiro [and] Nat Hentoff
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
A work of considerable substance. ? The New Yorker. In this marvelous oral history, the words of such legends as Louis Armstrong, Fats Waller, Jelly Roll Morton, Duke Ellington, and Billy Holiday trace the birth, growth, and changes in jazz over the years. Includes excerpts from hundreds of personal interviews, letters, tapes, and articles
Member of
Biography type
contains biographical information
Cataloging source
VALIL
Dewey number
785.4/2
Index
no index present
LC call number
ML3561.J3
LC item number
S46 1966eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Freading eBooks
Target audience
adult
Hear me talkin' to ya : the story of jazz as told by the men who made it, edited by Nat Shapiro [and] Nat Hentoff, (electronic resource ;)
Label
Hear me talkin' to ya : the story of jazz as told by the men who made it, edited by Nat Shapiro [and] Nat Hentoff, (electronic resource ;)
Link
https://epl.freading.com/ebooks/details/r:download/ZnJlYWQ6OTc4MDQ4NjE3MTM2NDpl
Publication
Copyright
Note
"This Dover edition is a reprint of the work originally published by Rinehart and Company, inc., in 1955."
Related Contributor
Related Location
Related Agents
Related Authorities
Related Subjects
Related Items
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Part One : "Way down yonder in New Orleans" -- It was always a musical town -- especailly The District -- Storyville -- For every occasion -- dances, funerals, parties, and parades -- there was a band and there were some mighty battles -- The kids were poor and they often improvised their instruments as well as their music -- Bunk Johnson, King Oliver, Louis Armstrong, Kid Ory, Freddie Keppard, Buddy Petit, Manuel perez, Clarence Williams, Chris Kelly, Buddy Bolden -- they all called the children home -- Then the Navy closed Storyville down. But jazz went on in New Orleans -- and it's still going on -- Part Two : "Up a lazy river" -- Many of the jazzmen worked their way North in Fate Marable's riverboat bands -- Downtown was the Original Dixieland Jazz band ; and on chicago's South Side you could rock to the music of Keppard, Oliver, Armstrong, Ory, Johnny and Baby Dodds, Preston Jackson, Jimmie Noone, Lil Armstrong, and many more -- Chicago had its "second line" too -- the Austin High Gang, Muggsy Spanier, George Wettling and Benny Goodman. They listened and learned -- Jam sessions, gangsters, speakeasies, recording sessions, more musicians, and then -- the Chicago decline -- "In a mist" -- the legendary Bix -- Part Three : "Travelin' Light" -- . . .to Harlem, which really jumped -- on through the 'twenties to the depression years. Armstrong came to town, and everybody knew the great pianists like James P. Johnson and Willie "the Lion" Smith, and bands like Charlie Johnson's, Cecil Scott's, Sam Wooding's, and the Cotton Pickers. King Oliver and Jelly Roll had their day, and among those coming up were Chick Webb, at the Savoy, and Billie Holiday, singing those depression blues -- . . .and there were Fletcher Henderson and the great musicians who worked for him -- Louis Armstrong, Coleman Hawkins, Joe Smith, Jimmy Harrison, and the rest -- "Ellingtown plays the piano, but the real instrument is his band" -- Bessie Smith -- "the Empress of the Blues" -- . . .and spreading his special brand of musical joy -- Fats Waller -- New York's "second line" -- the men who played with Whiteman and Goldkette, Red Nichols and Ben Pollack -- From Kansas City, a musician's town, came stories of fabulous jam sessions, good times, and the swinging band of Count Basie -- The Swing Era -- big bands, big money, jitterbugs, one-night stands, commercialism, and the breakdown of some racial barriers -- Part Four "Undecided" -- The experimenters -- Thelonius Monk, Dizzie Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Kenny Clarke, Mary Lou Williams, Charlie Christian -- made their headquarters uptown, at a place called Minton's -- Downtown, Fifty-second Street was the proving ground for what became known as "bop." Young musicians and veterans were playing the new music on The Street -- About a problem -- narcotics -- New sounds from big bands -- Stan Kenton, Woody Herman, and Dizzie Gillespie -- The present -- where paths cross -- notably those of some of the younger jazzmen and some "serious" composers. The West Coast school develops, and the Dixieland revival takes shape -- Coda
Control code
ocn829159916
http://library.link/vocab/cover_art
https://secure.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9780486171364/LC.GIF&client=780-496-1833&type=xw12&upc=&oclc=%28Sirsi%29%20f829159916
Dimensions
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'EPLMNA': 'https://epl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/1347267005'}
Extent
1 online resource (xvi, 429 pages).
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780486171364
Isbn Type
(electronic bk.)
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (Sirsi) f829159916
  • (CaAE) f829159916

Library Locations

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      53.542897 -113.48975860000002
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