The Resource Sympathy, madness, and crime : how four Nineteenth-Century journalists made the newspaper women's business, Karen Roggenkamp, (electronic resource)

Sympathy, madness, and crime : how four Nineteenth-Century journalists made the newspaper women's business, Karen Roggenkamp, (electronic resource)

Label
Sympathy, madness, and crime : how four Nineteenth-Century journalists made the newspaper women's business
Title
Sympathy, madness, and crime
Title remainder
how four Nineteenth-Century journalists made the newspaper women's business
Statement of responsibility
Karen Roggenkamp
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
In one of her escapades as a reporter for Joseph Pulitzer's New York World, the renowned Nellie Bly feigned insanity in 1889 and slipped, undercover, behind the grim walls of Blackwell's Island mental asylum. She emerged ten days later with a vivid tale about life in a madhouse. Her asylum articles merged sympathy and sensationalism, highlighting a developing professional identity--that of the American newspaperwoman. The Blackwell's Island story is just one example of how newspaperwomen used sympathetic rhetoric to depict madness and crime while striving to establish their credentials as professional writers. Working against critics who would deny them access to the newsroom, Margaret Fuller, Fanny Fern, Nellie Bly, and Elizabeth Jordan subverted the charge that women were not emotionally equipped to work for mass-market newspapers. They transformed their supposed liabilities into professional assets, and Sympathy, Madness, and Crime explores how, in writing about insane asylums, the mentally ill, prisons, and criminals, each deployed a highly gendered sympathetic language to excavate a professional space within a male-dominated workplace. As the periodical market burgeoned, these pioneering, courageous women exemplified how narrative sympathy opened female space within the "hard news" city room of America's largest news- papers. Sympathy, Madness, and Crime offers a new chapter in the unfolding histories of nineteenth-century periodical culture, women's professional authorship, and the narrative construction of American penal and psychiatric institutions
Member of
Cataloging source
CtWfDGI
Dewey number
071/.3082
Index
no index present
LC call number
PN4888.W66
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Freading eBooks
Target audience
adult
Sympathy, madness, and crime : how four Nineteenth-Century journalists made the newspaper women's business, Karen Roggenkamp, (electronic resource)
Label
Sympathy, madness, and crime : how four Nineteenth-Century journalists made the newspaper women's business, Karen Roggenkamp, (electronic resource)
Link
https://epl.freading.com/ebooks/details/r:download/OTc4MTYzMTAxMjMyNw==
Publication
Copyright
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Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
frd00012566
http://library.link/vocab/cover_art
https://secure.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9781631012327/LC.GIF&client=780-496-1833&type=xw12&upc=&oclc=%28Sirsi%29%20frd00012566
Dimensions
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'EPLMNA': 'https://epl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/1877680005'}
Extent
1 online resource (192 pages).
File format
one file format
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Access limited to subscribing institutions
Isbn
9781631012327
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (Sirsi) frd00012566
  • (CaAE) frd00012566

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