The Resource The innovation paradox : why good businesses kill breakthroughs and how they can change, Tony Davila, Marc J. Epstein

The innovation paradox : why good businesses kill breakthroughs and how they can change, Tony Davila, Marc J. Epstein

Label
The innovation paradox : why good businesses kill breakthroughs and how they can change
Title
The innovation paradox
Title remainder
why good businesses kill breakthroughs and how they can change
Statement of responsibility
Tony Davila, Marc J. Epstein
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • " It's a paradox: as big companies get better at achieving operational excellence, actual breakthroughs seem to decrease. It's the scrappy little startups, with comparatively tiny budgets, that continue to be founts of innovation. Why is it that as industry leaders get better at what they do, they get worse at innovation? By conducting deep research within companies as diverse as Apple, Google, Pfizer, General Motors, Nike, and Sony, the authors have found the answer: the very pursuit of operational excellence--that is, making one's existing business as efficient as it can be--blinds managers to the kinds of disruptive business model changes vital for innovation. These changes could threaten all that hard work. It's why Nokia famously killed its smart phone--the company was too invested in "dumb phones." Nothing less than a complete redesign and rethinking of the corporation--down to how accountants capture innovation costs and overhead--is necessary to get companies moving again. The authors' new model, "the startup corporation," marries the strengths of corporate scale to the nimbleness of entrepreneurs. For a model of the new startup corporation, the authors return again and again to Apple, which doesn't have the usual corporate structure and accounting systems. Not every company can be an Apple, but all companies can learn to break the bonds of operational thinking if they'll take the authors' lessons to heart"--
  • "From the bestselling authors of Making Innovation Work (30,000 copies sold and translated into ten languages) comes a book that questions everything about how organizations innovate. Key takeaway: classical business management and corporate structures by their very nature will kill, not create, breakthroughs. The authors describe a new kind of organization--the startup corporation--that will make established companies as innovative as startups"--
Member of
Assigning source
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
N$T
Dewey number
658.4/063
Index
no index present
LC call number
HD58.8
LC item number
.D3698 2014eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
  • Freading eBooks
  • A BK business book
Target audience
adult
The innovation paradox : why good businesses kill breakthroughs and how they can change, Tony Davila, Marc J. Epstein
Label
The innovation paradox : why good businesses kill breakthroughs and how they can change, Tony Davila, Marc J. Epstein
Publication
Copyright
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Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references, Internet addresses and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
1651734
http://library.link/vocab/cover_art
https://secure.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9781609945534/LC.GIF&client=780-496-1833&type=xw12&upc=&oclc=%28Sirsi%29%20LSC2537369
Dimensions
25 cm
http://library.link/vocab/discovery_link
{'EPLWMC': 'https://epl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/1355141005'}
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xvii, 217 pages
Isbn
9781609945534
Lccn
2014012548
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) LSC2537369
  • (OCoLC)883824734
  • LSC2537369

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